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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
a vote, namely to have their own state in israel. obviously we went up to make one more try to make our news note to president abbas and urge him to reconsider. so obviously make his own decisions and he will be back in new york tomorrow. but we thought it was important to make her case one more time. >> sorry, your understanding of the palestinian goal here in terms of this resolution is they expect to get a state out of their? >> that's not what i said. i said it is the old basic overall. >> survey should not be allowed to have anything interim? they either go all the way, he do with the israelis do nothing for the palestinians in between. >> we have made clear and talked about this all week long and i don't think we need to read syndicated own mother time here that this resolution is not owing to take them closer to statehood. it does nothing to get them closer to statehood and it may make the environment more difficult. >> -- any specifics on economic impact in the israelis, do they have on financing? >> i don't have anymore details from from the actual meeting room today, but we've
as well. israel has to know that they can live in peace and security, just as palestinians need to know they can live in a viable state. it is very important to understand both sides of the argument and i don't think that is where very good example of that. >> [inaudible] and the government over the past two years, it has been rejected by the palestinian authority. >> yet it does require bilateral talks. i think that there is, as i was indicating a few minutes ago, faults on both sides when it comes to efforts to have negotiations of the last few years. israel has been wanting to negotiate into negotiations. they have not been the more decisive offer of anything seen in recent years. anything that has been called for. i think both of those things are going to have to change if we are going to see a successful process. >> mr. fitzpatrick? >> the foreign secretary said he's worried he is worried about the backlash from israel and others. given the sentiments, the refugee camps come at the object policy and the rest come how much more can we get that also means? >> well, unfortunately it c
of israel, amazingly strong stateswoman. one of the stateswoman in there. i felt like it was very important. it is interesting. she has a story in the history this based so much on what we would call his book, but pushing her way through things. and try to figure out, was the lesson. i don't want to the -- i didn't want to -- she raised so much money in america, came here looking for money and found millions of dollars to support and help israel grow, but i did not want it to be about fund-raising. i found this one story that i love. she used to invite other statesmen out to her house bury she would bring into her kitchen . and first, it took me awhile. i don't want to say that she's in her kitchen doing things. that's not the lesson. but the reason she brought them there is so that they would see the world on her terms. she brings them to her place. it's funny. i handed it into the editor. he said to me, i have one problem with the book. one of the once you looked at. i said, was the problem? you use one word over and over and over again. a fighter. use the word fighter in almost every ent
that hope both here and in israel that the squeeze of sanctions will somehow hasten the regime change in iran. in other words it is some other purpose besides leverage for getting the concessions on the nuclear issue and that isn't withstanding the prospect that even if there were regime change, and i certainly wouldn't advise holding your breath and waiting for it, it would mean whoever comes into power and say they would fold on the nuclear issue, not likely given the broad support that a nuclear program is peaceful nuclear program has in iran. note also that a lot of the u.s. imposed sanctions as embedded in the legislation have had other issues besides the nuclear one stated as a rationale, human rights, that sort of thing, relations with terrorist groups, and so it would be very difficult here on the hill to get back down on that even if the negotiations went well with the iranians. all of these constraints do not go very well for taking advantage of that negotiating space that does exist, and showing flexibility in using sanctions for what they ostensibly ought to be used for wh
to supporters on capitol hill. she was joined by representative steve israel and congressman steny hoyer of maryland. >> it is going to be a good evening. our president is going to be our president. steve israel is assuring me we will pick up states in the house and yes, we think we're going to take back the house. i am so pleased to be year. -- to be here. we are fighting for the priorities our country knows are important. for the values that this country knows is critically important. for investing in education, in growing our jobs in america, in investing in protecting our environment and investing in the health care of our people. americans believe lyonesse priorities. i want to congratulate my friend steve israel for the extraordinary job he has done. i have gone through this country, i have been in almost 90 districts, 89 districts in this country. campaigning with extraordinary candidates. some incumbents khomeni challengers. they are extraordinary people who will do an excellent, outstanding job as a members of the congress. steve israel has set an objective. he has worked hard a
on this friday, november 23, 2012. we begin overseas. the cease-fire between hamas and israel has held. in egypt, president mohamed morsi showed his authority yesterday. a startling port grab, freeing himself from traditional oversight. president obama followed through on an annual tradition of calling 10 service members to personally thank them for their service. the washington times and the new york times reporting there are now more state capitols dominated by a single party that than at any time since 1952. the washington times question, is this the answer, secure for gridlock? we'll get your answers. send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. also, you can e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the washington times for our question for all new this morning, there headline -- do you think this could be a cure for gridlock? the new york times also has this headline this morning -- we want to hear from you this morning. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? wh
of benjamin netanyahu who goes on to become prime minister of israel. then in 1977, he takes a position at another consulting firm, bain & company. after a few years, the company's ceo and founder, bill bain, asks romney to head up a spinoff -- bain capital. >> mitt was hesitant. he was making a good salary. he had a growing family, and he essentially said no. and bill bain said run this new company called bain capital, and if it fails, i'll bring you back to bain & company. so you sort of can't lose. >> bain capital initially invests in startup companies. in 1986, after a tough two years, bain strikes it big. >> we invested in staples early in the year and staples and -- in pretty short order started doing well. we also helped start sports authority, bright horizons, all within a six or nine-month period. >> romney helps launch staples, not only with money, but with business and strategic advice. >> this can be a hundred stores so it looks like it could be something big. >> mitt was critical. he acted as our lead investor. and a lead investor in an early stage company is very important
, the president has not visited israel once. the jewish commercially -- community -- we feel he doesn't have our back. romney has made a strong point that he will have our back. host: did romney's relationship with the jewish community come up? guest: as a candidate he talks about the fact that he has a personal relationship dating back to time and harvard with ande minister aniston netanyahu that will be benefit. he said the united states position towards israel will be complete support. it was not clear how he would respond if israel tried to take out nuclear facilities in iraq. i think republicans feel they have made some headway, particularly in florida with jewish voters. we will see. host: brian mooney has covered politics in massachusetts for decades. he has been with "the boston globe" since 1988 and has been a political columnist. right now he goes by the title reporter. a story you did last year when health care was a big issue. looking back on the health-care issue, you recall that he went to get his official portrait done. he would be at his desk wearing a business suit and tie. host
right, my top issue is that there's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. and when president obama spoke about the big yellow bird, i don't think he was talking about the big yellow bird, i think he was talking, you know, big bird on tv, i think he was talking about china. china, you know, chinese people, oriental people are referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that they force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human life at all. and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we help israel go to war with iran, then we're going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that's a really big problem, and we have to just put a stop to it and negotiate peace. >> well, as i said in the opening statement that, um, i really feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to, um, to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken. and we need to fix it, or this
evidence of that. of t dspite? >> of the dispute? >> ifill: well, richard murdoch. >> israel, rished murdoch became almost the third rail of local politics. even though what he said, you know, was consistent with-- it was-- and not indefensible. there appeared to be a callous, almost disregard for the terrible experience of being raped, let alone a pregnancy coming out of that rape. >> you talk about the gender issue. it's always important to stinguish between married women and single women. >> that's right. >> married women were very strongly for republicans, single women very strongly for democrats. the sociological trend over the past 20 years is there are a lot more single people, men and women. so the numbers just get bigger as the country goes into what they call living solo. >> woodruff: and it calls to mind the strategy that obama very transparently employed, talking about planned parenthood, talking about the position of the republicans on-- not just on abortion but on contraception, and there was a lot of criticism-- has be a lot of criticism-- >> i've heard criticism from
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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